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Author Topic: Crotch Facing  (Read 5391 times)
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BetsyConnolly
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« on: July 01, 2015, 05:23:48 PM »

I'm working on a new pair of drawers drafted from Liz's instructions, and I'd like to add a crotch facing to them, rather than just turning the edge under. I used to have a pattern for drawers with a crotch facing, but I can't find it at the moment, and I don't have any drawers to reference. Can anyone point me in the right direction, or provide some instructions? Specifically, do I cut the facing on the straight of grain, or on the bias?
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Betsy Connolly
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Carolann Schmitt
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2015, 05:58:35 PM »

You can draw a facing piece by tracing the crotch seam and a couple of inches of the upper leg, depending on the desired width of your facing. Add seam allowances and you're good to go.  Match the grain line on the drawers in that area. 
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Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2015, 06:12:47 PM »

Pardon the impertinence, but I've never heard of using a facing on that part of the garment, and was curious about how it compares to the turned hem. Does it make the drawers more comfortable? More durable? Easier to sew? Nothing in particular, just an alternate construction method? 

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BetsyConnolly
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2015, 06:18:01 PM »

Carolann to the rescue! If the crotch is simply cut on the straight of grain, does that mean I can just use a strip of fabric?

Pardon the impertinence, but I've never heard of using a facing on that part of the garment, and was curious about how it compares to the turned hem. Does it make the drawers more comfortable? More durable? Easier to sew? Nothing in particular, just an alternate construction method? 




I like it because...well, for lack of a better description, it soaks up more sweat and doesn't chafe quite as badly in sensitive areas. I also find it more durable, but that's generally a given with the double layers of fabric.
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Betsy Connolly
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2015, 07:24:58 PM »

I've been using a binding on some edges of my drawers as per instructions from... Godeys I think... and I just finished a pair of drawers for the little squirts as per La Mode Illustree 1862 which also called for binding.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2015, 01:38:19 PM »

Hemming will create a bit of a ridge that some find uncomfortable; a facing leaves minimally less ridge there, and a smooth finish all the way to the edge, which can be very comfortable.

When the single layer of fabric begins to wear, facings can extend the life nicely, too.

A facing also has a tad more body, so if you're finding yourself annoyed that the crutch edge keeps crumpling and creating up in uncomfortable ways, a facing helps keep things more smooth and stable.

Binding can also be done; depending on the width of the binding, you can get an almost faced result.

Regardless of the finish method, adding a facing to extend the life of the drawers is a great re-make!
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Elizabeth
BetsyConnolly
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« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2015, 02:24:12 PM »

I answered my own question above - cutting strips on the straight of grain does work, but then you have to trace out the corresponding curve of the inseam, and the angle of what a friend so eloquently calls the "butt gusset", which is easily done. I put them in last night, and it couldn't have been easier. With the customized fit of Liz's drafting instructions, pimatex cotton (which even irons nicer than anything else!) and the addition of the faced crotch, these may just be the most comfortable drawers I have ever owned!
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Betsy Connolly
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2015, 11:09:12 AM »

Here's to comfortable, well-fitting drawers! May you frolic with joy all the days of your drawers.
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Elizabeth
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