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Author Topic: Beaded and "Tartanware" Bracelets  (Read 16130 times)
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Stephanie Brennan
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« on: May 06, 2015, 12:39:21 PM »

New endeavors beaded and tartan ware bracelet

 
« Last Edit: May 06, 2015, 12:42:18 PM by Stephanie Brennan » Logged
EKorsmo
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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2015, 04:23:12 PM »

Very pretty!  May I ask were you found such a clasp?
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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2015, 04:56:52 AM »

  Yes of course!   The clasps are make do, since originals seem to be in short supply. They are composed of three parts. Two multistrand ends in the Greek key design glued on a slide tab clasp from Firemountain Gems and beads.
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Dana Repp
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« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2015, 08:58:37 AM »

Those are pretty little bits!  What are the sizes? They look quite large in the photo but it could be my grossly-enlarged-screen-so-I-don't-have-to-wear-my-cheaters.  Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2015, 06:42:34 PM »

Thanks for the finding info.  Will not use it for evil.
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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2015, 07:19:44 AM »

The beaded bracelet is just shy of 2 in. wide and 7 1/2 long
  original-
.http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/110152?rpp=30&pg=2&rndkey=20150410&ft=*&deptids=8&when=A.D.+1800-1900&what=Beads&pos=56

Directions for making these bracelets can be found in Peterson's Magazine Feb.  and March  1862

Tartan Bracelet-
  Center oval is 1 3/4 in long
The original is 2 1/4 long.


« Last Edit: May 08, 2015, 07:22:33 AM by Stephanie Brennan » Logged
Colleen
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« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2015, 02:22:45 PM »

LOVE these...and so happy to see more "home-made" jewelry, since it was so prevalent in the period!!

Colleen
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Colleen Formby
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Allison vV
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« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2015, 03:46:09 PM »

That is beautiful work! I love the colours.
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« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2015, 10:35:52 PM »

Wonderful work, well done!
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Colleen
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« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2015, 01:22:08 PM »

  Yes of course!   The clasps are make do, since originals seem to be in short supply. They are composed of three parts. Two multistrand ends in the Greek key design glued on a slide tab clasp from Firemountain Gems and beads.

Stephanie.....can you show the back of the clasp? I'm have a bit of trouble "seeing" how it clasps, and this is one of the best make-dos I've seen!

Colleen
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Colleen Formby
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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2015, 02:44:52 AM »


 First of all-  Thank You for all the nice comments.

For the clasp  I don't have my photographer handy, but I'll share some links and instructions on how to put together a "make do" clasp.

http://www.firemountaingems.com/shop/terminators--gold?itemsperpage=100&sortby=bestmatch
 
 Half way down this page are the key greek terminator ends that were used. Using wire cutters remove the single loop on the side and file any remaining metal to smooth out. Make two of these.
  Next file down loop on one end of terminator. The O loop should become D shape. The goal is for two pieces to become one long vertical piece. So you will be filing down the opposite loop on the other piece.
  To attach the two, place filed ends side by side.  Then glue a thin strip of wood to the back. I used a wood coffee stirrer cut to size. After the glue dries, paint the wood gold.
  This completes the decorative part.

Box clasps
http://www.firemountaingems.com/itemdetails/h205121fd
http://www.firemountaingems.com/itemdetails/h204298fd
 
 The box clasp is underneath the decorative bit. It helps to flatten the top with a hammer. Be careful not to overdue or the clasp will not work. 
  I first sewed on the decorative end to the piece of needlework. Then the box clasp was glued to the underneath side, left to dry, and then sewn in place.
 The box clasp tab was sewn to the other side of the needlework.
             
          Hopefully this is clearer than mud..... Undecided
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Colleen
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« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2015, 11:02:53 AM »


 First of all-  Thank You for all the nice comments.

For the clasp  I don't have my photographer handy, but I'll share some links and instructions on how to put together a "make do" clasp.

http://www.firemountaingems.com/shop/terminators--gold?itemsperpage=100&sortby=bestmatch
  
 Half way down this page are the key greek terminator ends that were used. Using wire cutters remove the single loop on the side and file any remaining metal to smooth out. Make two of these.
  Next file down loop on one end of terminator. The O loop should become D shape. The goal is for two pieces to become one long vertical piece. So you will be filing down the opposite loop on the other piece.
  To attach the two, place filed ends side by side.  Then glue a thin strip of wood to the back. I used a wood coffee stirrer cut to size. After the glue dries, paint the wood gold.
  This completes the decorative part.

Box clasps
http://www.firemountaingems.com/itemdetails/h205121fd
http://www.firemountaingems.com/itemdetails/h204298fd
 
 The box clasp is underneath the decorative bit. It helps to flatten the top with a hammer. Be careful not to overdue or the clasp will not work.  
  I first sewed on the decorative end to the piece of needlework. Then the box clasp was glued to the underneath side, left to dry, and then sewn in place.
 The box clasp tab was sewn to the other side of the needlework.
            
          Hopefully this is clearer than mud..... Undecided



Actually, PERFECTLY clear.....now to store it away! I DO love the fact that this style forum, as opposed to Facebook groups, DOES keep info and makes it easy to find!

Colleen
« Last Edit: June 09, 2015, 11:05:30 AM by Colleen » Logged

Colleen Formby
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2015, 02:05:59 PM »

Stephanie, the green is never going to come out of my clothes.  I am leaking envy.  How long did that take you?  It's beautiful work.
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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2015, 09:53:45 AM »

Sorry I did not reply sooner. Heidi I didn't keep track of hours but I did use a magnifying lens and Ott light.  I could only work one - two hours at a time without my eyes going a bit cross-eyed.

I'm now attempting some pieces in silk gauze. For those of you who don't know silk gauze is used for those who like miniature needlepoint, being anywhere from 18-104 stitches per inch. Most  needlepointers work in the 40 range.                                    Stephanie
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Elaine M
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« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2015, 09:13:29 AM »

Stephanie,
These are beautiful!  I too am most envious!  I have never heard of tartanware; would you please be willing to share information about it?  I'm sure I could look it up, but I'll be very honest - I'm feeling lazy this morning.

Elaine Masciale
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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2015, 10:10:14 AM »

 The history of tartanware begins with Queen Victoria's interest in Scotland. It soon became a destination place for tourists. There was renewed interest in tartan. Manufactures did not disappoint. Mauchline Ware, already famous for producing transfers to wooden ware, soon took over and produced tartan ware in large quantity.

   The first pieces of tartanware were hand painted on wood plaques in the 1840's. By 1853  machines applied the patterns to paper and then were affixed to the wood shapes and covered with varnish.  Tartanware was made well into the 19th century.

Advertisements can be read in the back of period books. There are  also a few modern books with examples.
 
Tartanware is not something that holds up very well as it was made for a tourist market. Most pieces that are available now are from the later years of the 19th c. Bracelets are far and few between. The center plaque of the bracelet often has a picture of a Loch or a tartan pattern.  The bracelet I copied came from an original hand painted piece and is very unusual.
 
modified to add site link:   https://www.pinterest.com/axelschuurman/tartanmauchline-ware-scotland/
« Last Edit: October 01, 2015, 06:20:14 AM by Stephanie Brennan » Logged
Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2015, 06:21:43 PM »

  A book on Tartan ware
  http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=tartanware


period advertisement-
https://books.google.com/books?id=1fsGAAAAQAAJ&pg=RA1-PA48&dq=tartan+plaid+bracelet&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAWoVChMI9IvFt7DIyAIVi9YeCh0G-Agz#v=onepage&q=tartan%20plaid%20bracelet&f=false
« Last Edit: October 18, 2015, 05:46:51 PM by Stephanie Brennan » Logged
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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2015, 05:27:24 PM »

That's a pretty diverse range of goods.  I find it interesting that they lead with "tartan paper cutters"--I'm having trouble imagining what those look like, or who would want a specifically tartan one...
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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2015, 05:51:42 PM »

  A paper cutter is basically a letter opener, just sharper. The handle would be done in a tartan pattern.  

  If you have time sneak a peek at Mrs Mescher's article on paper sizes. It describes  how you would cut  paper down to the size you needed.

old thread


 http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=3872.0
« Last Edit: October 18, 2015, 05:57:58 PM by Stephanie Brennan » Logged
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