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BetsyConnolly
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« on: January 08, 2015, 08:02:32 AM »

This is a strange question, but it has a good purpose Smiley Does anyone have any information on stuffed/plush animals in the period? How did children play with toy animals?
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Betsy Connolly
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2015, 09:35:44 AM »

Peterson's ran instructions for a plush rabbit and duck in '59.  (The rabbit's on page 284, I can't seem to get a link to it).

Haven't seen anything about how they were used, though.
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mmescher
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2015, 03:47:39 PM »

A lot of toys were made of wood.  There was a literal cottage industry in Germany making carved wooden toys for export with some of the painting being done by the wood carver's family producing some interesting colored animals (e.g., a yellow horse with orange spots on it).  The animals could have been used by themselves or put on wheeled platforms as pull toys.  Noah's arks were also popular and those would have wooden animals.

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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2015, 09:13:27 AM »

   Stuffed animals are one of those gray areas. They fall under the category of folk toys and are hard to date, so they give a range of years. References show them  made from wool, linen, and cotton. The toys are fairly simplistic in shape. They can include corn silk and animal hair for realistic touches.

   The aforementioned rabbit from Peterson's shows up in a painting owned by the National Art gallery in DC being held by a small girl. The rabbit is white and has red eyes. My first thought was, it closely resembles a beanie baby rabbit.
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Stephanie Brennan
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2015, 12:38:51 PM »

 Sorry this is so late. After sifting through visual and reading information, this is what I came up with.

  Visual information paintings, SV's, and photos, show multiple images  of children with live animals. Reading sources mimic the same thing. I found two paintings, both girls, with a small stuffed rabbit. Although the  antique stuffed animals that I have seen contributed to this period have been ducks and geese.
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