Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Designing New Cotton Dress  (Read 4693 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Michaela C
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 150


WWW
« on: December 18, 2014, 05:29:08 PM »

Hello all sewing friends! For Christmas, I bought my 12 year old sister some gray and blue plaid homespun fabric for a new dress. We have been discussing some design ideas, but I wanted your opinions before starting the mock up.

1. She likes petal sleeves.
2. She wanted a bodice that was a little more smooth-fitting (not exactly tight) vs. like a yoked or infant style bodice. She really doesn't care as much for the especially full ones.
3. She wanted a wider neckline.

So I guess my main question is are all these elements alright for a cotton dress? She is flexible, she just wanted something cooler for summer time as her only other dress is dark, long-sleeved, and rather heavy. I've been trying to find some reference pics, but couldn't figure out if the fabric of the dress' was cotton or something nicer.

Logged

My soul is fed with needle and thread!
Mrs Johnson
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 195



« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2014, 05:14:01 PM »

i would think so... maybe not the petal sleeves.  i'm definitely not an expert, lol, but that seems like it would be something on a fancier dress and not a homespun. 

i'm doing a dress with a smooth bodice right now, it's much easier to put together lol.
Logged

~ Jennifer
Michaela C
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 150


WWW
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2014, 05:54:02 PM »

I know this is always a question that comes up and the answer is firmly negative, but my sister really likes the idea of solid turquoise piping. The fabric itself is gray and turquoise plaid. I figured this was unacceptable, but wasn't sure.
Logged

My soul is fed with needle and thread!
Allison vV
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 264



« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2014, 12:21:07 AM »

I'm questioning the suitability of the petal sleeves, as well, but I hope some of the more knowledgeable folks will be along to help.

As to contrasting piping, you are right. Smiley  I double checked with a search on the forum, and contrasting piping was extremely rare.  This thread is quite helpful:

http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=3094.msg49047#msg49047

If she would like to emphasize the turquoise in the plaid you could use ribbon trims, or perhaps a silk belt quite effectively, depending on how suit your fabric.
Logged

Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
EKorsmo
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 489


WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2014, 12:34:58 AM »

Depending on the scale of the plaid, you could also emphasize the turquoise in the cut of the dress itself: waist bands and cuffs cut along a turquoise stripe, gauging the skirt or pleating the bodice to pack the turquoise sections foremost, tucks on the skirt that put rows of turquoise together.   Plaids are fun!
Logged

Michaela C
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 150


WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2014, 10:54:52 AM »

So is the general concensus no on the petal sleeves?
Logged

My soul is fed with needle and thread!
EKorsmo
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 489


WWW
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2014, 07:03:43 PM »

I'm afraid I don't know much about children's clothing.

But here are some original cotton dresses, just for fun:

http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/96426?rpp=90&pg=6&ft=cotton%2c+dress&when=A.D.+1800-1900&pos=451

http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/159521?rpp=90&pg=1&ft=cotton%2c+dress&when=A.D.+1800-1900&pos=56

http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/102998?rpp=90&pg=4&ft=cotton%2c+dress&when=A.D.+1800-1900&pos=296

http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/159520?rpp=90&pg=5&ft=cotton%2c+dress&when=A.D.+1800-1900&pos=402

http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/103021?rpp=90&pg=4&ft=cotton%2c+dress&when=A.D.+1800-1900&pos=312

http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/103008?rpp=90&pg=4&ft=cotton%2c+dress&when=A.D.+1800-1900&pos=307
Logged

Michaela C
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 150


WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2015, 12:38:52 PM »

OK, so the dress is going well, except that I'm having a hard time with the wide neckline having way too much ease. It's also a little tight right across the bust. I don't know how to go about changing the bodice without putting more into the neckline just to have a little more give across the middle of the bodice.
I'm trying to figure out how to use Mrs. Clark's instructions in the Dressmaker's Guide on how to help with that, but with gathers and not darts to help with that I'm totally confused. There has got to be someone out there that has dealt with this!
Logged

My soul is fed with needle and thread!
Allison vV
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 264



« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2015, 02:04:16 PM »

If you could post a picture, it would be helpful to "see" the problem in detail.

Working with gathers vs. darts will make little difference in how you modify and work with the bodice pieces. When interpreting the instructions in the Dressmaker's Guide for your situation, the only thing that should be different is that your waist dart only will be gathers, instead. Darts are still used to modify your mock-up, such as swinging a dart.

To add ease to the bust you don't have to add any to the neckline.  There are two ways that I think you could do this:

     1. On a mock-up, slash upward from the waist toward (not through) the shoulder, like Mrs. Clark does for Moderate Bodice Fullness, pg. 223.  This will add material in the bust area, without affecting the neck or shoulder, and the extra in the waist will be taken up in your gathers. Or . . .

     2. Cut a new mock-up with extra material in the seam allowances of side seam and armscye.  You can pin the center-front edge in place, and use the extra seam allowances to re-fit the bust area.  Keep in mind that both of these methods do not modify the centre-front edge, which needs to be kept on grain.

Now, to remove the ease in the neckline, follow Mrs. Clark's instructions on page 214 and "swing" the fullness in the neckline into the waist darts (which you will treat as gathers in the final piece).

I hope that helps you!  Figuring out how and where to make modifications is tricky, and there are often a couple of "right" ways to do it, but I find it an enjoyable challenge once I'm into it. Smiley
Logged

Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines