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 11 
 on: July 28, 2017, 07:10:35 AM 
Started by Mrs Johnson - Last post by Mrs Johnson
I've just started a volunteer opportunity... and it's whatever I want to do.  However, I have no idea what types of programs to do!  It's a site that has just recently begun doing tours and they want to add a living history element... it's 100% outdoors.

They need to be something that I can do by myself, or with the help of my 9yo daughter. 

I'm also throwing around the idea of doing a picnic, or a birthday party, talking about the clothing (differences between 1840's, 1850's 1860's?).  Years ago they did have a guy that did the different coffee substitutes during the ACW.

Oh!  and it's 1840-1865.

 12 
 on: July 05, 2017, 04:34:06 PM 
Started by Robin C - Last post by Ms. Jean
Robin, how about a cuff of wool fabric as close to the coat's wool as possible?

A modern dry cleaner or tuxedo rental shop may have black wool cut from pants legs during hemming.

There may be a short piece of black wool on Fashion Fabrics any extra will have many uses for LH.

https://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/c2224_discount-fabrics-pieces-5-yards-and-under?pageSize=15&refinementIds=4096669%3B4096748

Hhhmm, nothing perfect in the short cuts, perhaps the black/smoke would work?

HTH, Jean

(Edited to add the FFC link.)

 13 
 on: July 05, 2017, 01:05:59 PM 
Started by Eileen Hook - Last post by Eileen Hook
As you've made or tried to make the pattern, you know better than I.

 14 
 on: July 05, 2017, 12:25:03 PM 
Started by Eileen Hook - Last post by Joseph Stevens
I see what you mean about the pattern in Shep's book - perhaps a case of 'we all know how this is done, no need to explain'? ( aka 'make in the usual way')

Eileen

No, that was not the issue here. When I said that the pattern plate has errors, I meant it.

 15 
 on: July 05, 2017, 12:20:36 PM 
Started by Eileen Hook - Last post by Eileen Hook
I see what you mean about the pattern in Shep's book - perhaps a case of 'we all know how this is done, no need to explain'? ( aka 'make in the usual way')

Eileen

 16 
 on: July 05, 2017, 12:15:52 PM 
Started by Robin C - Last post by Joseph Stevens
I have been ask to alter a chaplains frock coat.  It fits pretty good excepting for the shoulders. The shoulder seams hang down about 2 inches.  When I reset the sleeves, it will make them to short.  There is no amount of hem that could lengthen the sleeves.  Question is would it be correct to add a velvet cuff? 

According to the Revised Regulations for the Army of the United States (1861), only officers holding the Brigadier General or higher were authorized to wear frock coats with velvet cuffs.

McClellan defined the "regulation" uniform for chaplains in 1861:

Quote
General Orders 102 November 25, 1861

III--In time of actual field service, officers of cavalry, artillery, and infantry are permitted to wear the light blue overcoat prescribed for enlisted men of the mounted corps.
IV--The uniform of chaplains of the army will be a plain black frock coat with standing collar, and one row of nine black buttons; plain black pantaloons; black felt hat, or army forage cap, without ornament. On occasions of ceremony, a plain chapeau de bras may be worn.
BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL MCCLELLAN

You could probably have quite the discussion about regulation vs. non-regulation uniforms and all the many variations one can find and document. However, that's really not a scope of discussion for this board. As to whether or not a velvet cuff would be appropriate, you're better off seeking that advice from a place like the Authentic Campaigner, which exist for discussion of military-related items.

 17 
 on: July 05, 2017, 12:04:19 PM 
Started by Eileen Hook - Last post by Joseph Stevens
I believe that Joseph is talking about the book SHIRTS & MEN'S HABERDASHERY 1840s TO 1920s by R.L. Shep and Gail Cariou. It is out of print. In this book, there is a pattern with a yoke from a 1857 GODEY'S as well as a Devere 1859 pattern with a yoke.
Brian Baird


That'd be the book. It also includes, as I said before, a pattern draft from Journal des Desmoiselles, 1845.

As has been discussed before elsewhere on TSA, it does not include a lot of patterns dated to the period of this board.  There's only four pre-1865:

  • Journal des Demoiselles, 1845
  • Godey's, 1857
  • Devere, 1859
  • Devere, 1862

The Godey's pattern is available for free online from a few different places: http://www.victoriana.com/Mens-Clothing/shirt-1857.html

And while I haven't used the 1859 Devere draft, I did use the 1862 version last week, and there's some pretty major errors in the pattern plate. And the descriptive text isn't fully accurate to the finished pattern pieces, either.

 18 
 on: July 04, 2017, 06:02:04 AM 
Started by Robin C - Last post by Jim_Ruley
You may have better luck asking at the Authentic Campaigner Forum, as we're all non-military here.  I was once told that chaplains held the honorary rank of Captain, but have not been able to substantiate that.  They do appear listed as officers in the Revised United States Army Regulations of 1861, with supply allowances on level with captains. Page 524 gives a description of the chaplain's uniform: "131. The uniform for Chaplains of the Army will be plain black frock coat with standing collar, and one row of nine black buttons; plain black pantaloons; black felt hat, or army forage cap, without ornament. On occasions of ceremony, a plain chapeau de bras may be worn."

There's some good information at this link:

http://howardlanham.tripod.com/linkgr4/link196.html

Union Chaplains received the same "pay and allowances" as a Captain of Cavalry (mounted officers got more money than foot because they had to buy and maintain horses).  This was not supposed to entitle them to wear officer's rank insignia, although apparently some did.

The official uniform was modified in August 1864 to add herringbone lace on the coat front, and a distinctive cap insignia:

http://howardlanham.tripod.com/go.htm

 19 
 on: July 03, 2017, 06:38:51 PM 
Started by Robin C - Last post by Ms. Jean
article with images:

http://www.phcmontreat.org/Exhibit-CWChaplains-Chaplaincy.html

HTH, Jean

 20 
 on: July 02, 2017, 08:24:33 PM 
Started by Robin C - Last post by EKorsmo
You may have better luck asking at the Authentic Campaigner Forum, as we're all non-military here.  I was once told that chaplains held the honorary rank of Captain, but have not been able to substantiate that.  They do appear listed as officers in the Revised United States Army Regulations of 1861, with supply allowances on level with captains. Page 524 gives a description of the chaplain's uniform: "131. The uniform for Chaplains of the Army will be plain black frock coat with standing collar, and one row of nine black buttons; plain black pantaloons; black felt hat, or army forage cap, without ornament. On occasions of ceremony, a plain chapeau de bras may be worn."

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